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  Total Value: $184,250.00

The first private gold coinage in the 19th century was struck by Templeton Reid, a jeweler and gunsmith, in Milledgeville, Georgia, in July 1830. To be closer to the mines, he moved to Gainesville, where most of his coins were made. Although weights were accurate, Reid's assays were not and his coins were slightly short of claimed value. Accordingly, he was severely attacked in the newspapers and soon lost the public's confidence. He closed his mint before the end of October in 1830; his output had amounted to only about 1,600 coins. Denominations struck were $2.50, $5, and $10.

The enigmatic later issues of Templeton Reid were probably made from California gold. Reid, who never went to California, was then a cotton-gin maker in Columbus, Georgia, where he died in 1851. The coins were in denominations of ten and twenty-five dollars. Struck copies of both exist in various metals. The only example known of the twenty-five-dollar piece was stolen from the cabinet of the U.S. Mint on August 16, 1858. It was never recovere.

A skilled German metallurgist, Christopher Bechtler, assisted by his son August and his nephew, also named Christopher, operated a private mint in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Rutherford County and other areas in the Piedmont region of North Carolina and Georgia were the principal sources of the nation's gold supply from 1790 until the California gold strikes in 1848.

The coins minted by the Bechtlers were of only three denominations, but they covered a wide variety of weights and sizes. Rotated dies are common throughout the series. In 1831, the Bechtlers produced the first gold dollar in the United States. The U.S. Mint struck its first circulating gold dollar in 1849. Bechtler coins were well accepted by the public and circulated widely in the Southeast.

The inscription AUGUST 1.1834 on several varieties of five-dollar pieces has a special significance. The secretary of the Treasury recommended to the Mint director that gold coins of the reduced weight bear the authorization date. This was not done on federal gold coinage, but the elder Christopher Bechtler evidently acted on the recommendation to avoid difficulty with Treasury authorities.

 
Coin ID
Type
Date
Svc
Grade
Price
Images
 Coin Description
Territorial Gold
RC3138
Territorial Gold
PCGS
MS61 CAC
$34,100
(1837-42) C Bechtler $2.50 PCGS MS61 CAC, 70g, 20c, K-13, R-6. Rare with CAC sticker! CAC pop 1/3 (7 total)...More >>>
RC31791
Territorial Gold
NGC
XF45
$24,100
1850 Baldwin $5 NGC XF45. Scarce Gold Rush issue...More >>>
RC31391
Territorial Gold
NGC
MS64
$40,350
1851 S.F. Standard Mint $5 NGC MS64 K-1. Nickel Alloy. 22.7mm. Finest known! NGC Population: 1/0. PCGS Population: 0/0....More >>>
RC3194
Cal Fractional Gold
PCGS
MS64
$16,800
1853 Arms of California PCGS MS64, R-5-. BG-435 50c Arms Rare! Crisp devices and lustrous surfaces...More >>>
RC3145
Territorial Gold
NGC
MS60
$42,000
1860 Clark Gruber Mountain $10 NGC MS60. K-3, R-5. One of the seminal Pioneer gold issues, featuring Pike's Peak, the mountain prospective gold miners sought during the Colorado gold rush...More >>>
RC3193
Cal Fractional Gold
PCGS
MS65
$10,100
1872 Round Indian BG-1207 G$1 PCGS MS65. Tied for finest known. Lovely...More >>>
RC31372
Territorial Gold
PCGS
MS61 CAC
$16,800
C Bechtler Gold $1 PCGS MS61 CAC, 30g, Star. K-1, R-4. Crisp strike. Rich lustre and incredible color...More >>>
RC7-281
Territorial Gold
PCGS
PRCAM
P.O.R
In 1850 Baldwin & Co. designed an 1850 $10 private gold coin that is known as The Horseman. The obverse displayed the image of a cowboy riding horseback...More >>>

The first private gold coinage in the 19th century was struck by Templeton Reid, a jeweler and gunsmith, in Milledgeville, Georgia, in July 1830. To be closer to the mines, he moved to Gainesville, where most of his coins were made. Although weights were accurate, Reid's assays were not and his coins were slightly short of claimed value. Accordingly, he was severely attacked in the newspapers and soon lost the public's confidence. He closed his mint before the end of October in 1830; his output had amounted to only about 1,600 coins. Denominations struck were $2.50, $5, and $10.

The enigmatic later issues of Templeton Reid were probably made from California gold. Reid, who never went to California, was then a cotton-gin maker in Columbus, Georgia, where he died in 1851. The coins were in denominations of ten and twenty-five dollars. Struck copies of both exist in various metals. The only example known of the twenty-five-dollar piece was stolen from the cabinet of the U.S. Mint on August 16, 1858. It was never recovere.

A skilled German metallurgist, Christopher Bechtler, assisted by his son August and his nephew, also named Christopher, operated a private mint in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Rutherford County and other areas in the Piedmont region of North Carolina and Georgia were the principal sources of the nation's gold supply from 1790 until the California gold strikes in 1848.

The coins minted by the Bechtlers were of only three denominations, but they covered a wide variety of weights and sizes. Rotated dies are common throughout the series. In 1831, the Bechtlers produced the first gold dollar in the United States. The U.S. Mint struck its first circulating gold dollar in 1849. Bechtler coins were well accepted by the public and circulated widely in the Southeast.

The inscription AUGUST 1.1834 on several varieties of five-dollar pieces has a special significance. The secretary of the Treasury recommended to the Mint director that gold coins of the reduced weight bear the authorization date. This was not done on federal gold coinage, but the elder Christopher Bechtler evidently acted on the recommendation to avoid difficulty with Treasury authorities.



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